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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
and structure our environments so that we change behavior in those environments and we develop natural barriers that control the movement of people through environments. so, one of the key aspects is ensuring that a property is beautiful, this it's functional, that it's welcoming and that it reduces the fears of crime, that it allows an environment where people take ownership and accountability for the properties that they occupy, either live, work or study in. >> kelly, really interesting and i don't mean to get too heady here but this reminded reading about it about the discipline and punish and talking about the design of the prison and the changes that the prison -- prison design had taken over the course of a century and the affect on the national psyche. and discipline through design. and what can happen there and i imagine it's very important to you to create space that is are safe but that don't feel oppressive and fortified. >> that's so true. it's -- you know, when you have an environment that is fortified that has these very blatant or obtrusive barriers or security features, what it
environment? we will ask national journal reporter coral davenport. we will be right back. >> ♪ ♪ [video clip] >> we have created a platform that we call a digital feedback system. a main component of the platform are an integral sensors that turns on when it's all it-- when you swallow it. it collects information about the medicines that you take and your heart rate and body rate and temperature. a wellness matrix. then it communicates via radio with a cell phone that you carry. they process the data and send it back to you as an application that can help you manage your health. >> we are at a point where we have had all these incremental and amazing changes over the last five years. now we are poised to really make some great leaps in complex diseases. our understanding of cancer in the last five years has forced the last 25. the next 10 years will really take us through some amazing advances. >> the latest advances in health technology from the international consumer electronics show. tonight at 8:00 eastern on c- span2. >> want can count the times that americans say we are the best countr
these decisions have on the environment that the u.s. is in. for most of history, we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can fight, but so that we can not fight. the other. that time made that is important -- the other point that tom made is to understand what is involved in military operations. there is a piece on the web that explains exactly what it is we can do with the troops we have at the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan. it is not just about bureaucrats in d.c.. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. do you does want to talk about that and several surrounding decisions? >> we have become very accustomed to throwing around numbers of troops, and people have gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious. the effect of that is that very few americans actually understand that there is a method for figuring out how many troops are actually needed to accomplish something. when the recommendation comes from a military commander, this cannot just, as this white house seems to think, the co
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
the right environment is the most important. how we can create this environment today with this kind of unstability, we need political stability. we need peace. we have struggle between the palestinians and israelis and egypt. we have to talk about it and be very frank to see how we can get to the end of this. for this reason, yes, frankly speaking i'm not very optimistic about all today. if i ask anyone what you want me to talk to about, talk about democracy, freedom, transparency, governments, rulers. let us work for this and this is very important. >> let me ask --, let me ask someone who has worked with some of these institutions under the most ex-rd nary conditions. you have helped functioning institution in the west bank. you created an economy that created extraordinary growth over the last three years and you've done it under very adverse circumstances. so what would be your advice to people trying to build these institutions? >> thank you. honestly i continue to the effort help the institutions not just myself and to get ready for the emergence of fully independent and state
of the political parties. i worry about the environment and all kinds of things, but the reality -- reliability of the u.s. debt, not at all. i am worried about the social and political stability of the world. a large part of europe that is depressioneriencing great levels of unemployment. and how long can we sustain u stable democratic system when 60 percent of the young people are out of work? that is the concern in europe right now. host: the twitter question touches on this. also, are there any models in europe that are succeeding? guest: if you look at sweden has handled this very well. the excess of welfare state is the problem. the biggest welfare state in the world and has driven through the crisis beautifully. my favorite, the little economy that could, iceland. they were supposed to turn into a smoking whole, but they broke their rules. they did not bail out the bankers. they were willing to let the currency to value. they were willing to let there be controls. it has a lower and a plumber rate than we do right now. -- unemployment rate than we do right now. britain is interesting. wh
are but a manifestation of the brilliance of nature to enable us to adapt to the environment in which we evolved, that somehow these characteristics determine our inate worth and value as human beings. that is the essence of racism. but that system was not cultivated into every intellectual commercial, judicial, religious philosophical medical system that we have. the imbalances you see in the country today -- i call them inequities' -- are but reflections of that deep-seated belief. is it a conscious in most of us? no. in some of us, ys. -- yes. i aniston the ku klux klan -- i understand the ku klux klan was going to have a rally. some people consciously adhere to that belief. but most of us have been swept up in it and we do not even know wit. it is easy to be at the top and never have to think about it. it is impossible to be on the bottom and not think about that on a daily basis and not internalize the absurdity of the devaluation of your humanity on a daily basis. my lovely daughter once said to me, "how did the story of african-americans get inverted into a story of victimization only?" "
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)